Ghostly Apparitions at West Point

Basement in Quarters 100.

Basement in Quarters 100, which is purported to be inhabited by the ghost of Thayer’s Irish maid, Molly. (Photo courtesy of Special Collections and Archives Department of USMA Library ca. 1965.)

Sleepy Hollow isn’t the only place in the Hudson Valley with sightings of ghostly apparitions and stories of otherworldly beings. According to legend, the old Morrison House (Quarters 107B) on Professors’ Row is sometimes inhabited by the ghost of a woman. One story claims that two servants who lived in the house in the 1920s became so frightened that they ran screaming from their room in the middle of the night. Father O’Keefe was called in to do an exorcism which reportedly sent the ghost to live under a railroad bridge on the east side of the Hudson.

Colonel Thayer’s quarters, in what is the current basement of Quarters 100, are also purported to be inhabited by the ghost of Thayer’s Irish maid, Molly. This female specter is said to muss the bedcovers in the “orderly room” and has even been accused of “borrowing” items and moving guests’ possessions. Perhaps she is unhappy about having extra visitors in the house.

In October of 1972, husband and wife team, Ed and Lorraine Warren, visited West Point to lecture on the supernatural. During that same visit the Warrens were asked to visit the Superintendent’s Quarters to investigate some unusual activity. Following the evening lecture the Warrens and a small group of officers and spouses returned to Quarters 100. Lorraine Warren closed her eyes and felt the presence of the ghost of a nineteenth-century soldier named Greer.

During this same month two first-year cadets, O’Connor & Victor, living in room 4714 in the 47th division, felt the presence of a phantom they described as a thin soldier, perhaps 5’ 6” in height, wearing a frayed full-dress coat and carrying a musket. On a subsequent evening upper- classmen slept in the room, and they too reported feeling the sensation of something otherworldly. The temperature of the room dropped from 27C to -18C. First Captain Joe Tallman and Deputy Brigade Commander Gary Newsom, who spent the night of November 6th in room 4714, were unmolested by the spirit. However, Cadet Jim O’Connor reported seeing the ghost on the wall of the room where he was staying. Perhaps the ghost was spooked by the upperclassmen.

Naval Academy Midshipman, William Gravell claimed responsibility for the ghost, saying he had created it using a slide, cheese cloth and a flashlight. West Point Cadets were not convinced by Gravell’s story. What do you think?

Content contributed by Elaine McConnell, Rare Books Curator

Staff Profile: Barbara Maroney-French

barbaraBarbara Maroney-French joined the United States Military Academy Library staff in June of this year, as Facility Support Assistant in our Administration Services Division.

This is Barbara’s second “tour” at West Point. Her first tour lasted 23 years, from 1977-2000, during which she progressed from a clerk-typist position in the USCC to Publications Coordinator/Editorial Advisor in Cadet Activities. It seems West Point is in her blood. Her parents met while working in the same office at West Point before getting married. Later, her mother was assigned to the Law Department which was located in the West Academic Building (now Pershing Barracks). Her dad held many supply/maintenance-related positions retiring as maintenance officer at the motor pool. Barbara’s maternal grandparents worked here as well–her grandmother, as a seamstress in the uniform factory and grandfather as a mechanic. She spent summers swimming in Delafield Pond with her best friend, whose father was a retired Air Force officer, and tagged along on trips to the commissary (then housed in Building 667). Her brother currently works on the Garrison side as a management analyst and his two sons were summer employees in DPW. Barbara’s husband of 17 years, Richard, now works at Association of Graduates as Vice President of IT.

In 2000, after the birth of her son, Barbara made a difficult decision to leave West Point, taking time to raise her children and work various jobs closer to home. Once her daughter and son were in school, she volunteered at her church and the kids’ elementary school PTA and worked part-time nearby. She wore many hats at two not-for-profit organizations: from 2005 until 2012 she was the Box Office Assistant and Development Assistant at the Paramount Center for the Arts; from 2007-2014 she worked as Administrative Manager for Copland House, Aaron Copland’s home, located in Westchester County.

During the last 14 years, working jobs outside of the government, Barbara honed her customer service skills and polished her website design and social media skills.

In her free time, Barbara loves doing family activities, working out, cooking and baking, photography, gardening, volunteering at a local animal shelter, and sewing.

Barbara says, “I know I made the right decision to stay home with both my children during the formative years.” And we’re glad she has returned to West Point. You’ll probably see her around the library making sure the Haig Room and collaborative classrooms are in tip-top shape for the next event, camera in hand, with a post on the library blog soon to follow.

Contents contributed by Manja Yirka, Continuing Resources Librarian

App of the Week – Mindly

We are continuing a series called App of the Week, wherein we recommend the best apps to support the academic experience. Please let us know what you think, and feel free to provide suggestions for apps we should review.

Have yappiconou ever been brainstorming for a paper or project, felt stuck, and needed a different way to look at your work? If you’ve ever drawn word bubbles to connect concepts and visualize a project, then you’ve created a basic mind map. Mind maps are a great visual organization tool, and an effective way to tackle any thinking or learning task, especially outlining research papers, creating presentations, and studying concepts for exams.

After contemplating the benefits of mind mapping and noticing a price tag on most mind mapping software, I hoped to find a free app that would suit my brainstorming/organizing needs–and serve as a great tool for students, too. Mindly is a relatively new app that appears to fit the bill.

TFAmindmap

TragicHerocircle

 Most helpful features:

  • Very easy to use – double tap on a circle to add text, change the color, or add an icon.
  • Tapping on a subtopic takes the subtopic to a new part of the screen, where you can add other associations, like notes or links (see photo above).
  • Design – if you’re a space nerd like me, you’ll probably appreciate the elegant, “planetary” look of the map.
  • The ability to use emoji icons, attach web links, photos, or notes to each topic/concept – perfect for organizing sources for a project
  • Great for group projects; map out a strategy with your teammates
  • With the free version, you can email your map, print it (with a printer that supports AirPrint), or save as PDF. Other files types and options are available with the paid version.
  • You can utilize your documents from any device with Mindly installed, via iCloud storage
  • You can have up to 3 maps with the free version, and unlimited elements with the paid. If you think you’ll be using different maps constantly, it may be worth the upgrade. If not, you can delete maps as you go along.

Downsides:

The free app is technically limited – you can unlock more features with the paid version of Mindly ($6.99), which gives you unlimited maps/elements and allows you to have the full version on all of your devices.

Bottom line:

Mindly’s simple, sleek features and user-friendly interface make it an effective way to visualize and map out any project. Check it out, show us your maps, and let us know what you think!

Further Reading:

How to Use Mind Maps to Unleash Your Brain’s Creativity and Potential

Mindly Makes Mind Mapping Simple and Beautiful on Small Screens

Mindly app review: Putting ideas in orbit

The views expressed in this post are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Army, Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government. No endorsement or recommendation of any specific products or services is intended or implied.

Contents contributed by Lauren Dodd Hall, Circulation Librarian

Pictures from Panama – Celebrating the Centennial

Jonas Lie, The Gates of Pedro Miguel, 1913.  Oil on canvas. (West Point Museum Collection, United States Military Academy; Anonymous gift in honor of MG George W. Goethals  (USMA 1880), chief engineer of the Panama Canal)

Jonas Lie, “The Gates of Pedro Miguel,” 1913. Oil on canvas. (West Point Museum Collection, United States Military Academy; Anonymous gift in honor of MG George W. Goethals (USMA 1880), chief engineer of the Panama Canal)

Opening at the West Point Museum in early December 2014, the exhibition Pictures from Panama celebrates the centennial anniversary of the opening of the Panama Canal and features a selection of artists who captured the construction of the canal in all of its glory and communicated the massive scale of this virtually incomprehensible feat of engineering to American audiences. This exhibition highlights a variety of paintings, prints, watercolors and photographs from the collections of the West Point Museum and the Special Collections and Archives Department of the United States Military Academy Library.

Ernest “Red” Hallen, Gatun Middle Locks. Construction of Center Wall, Looking North, from Upper Lock, February 15, 1911.  Gelatin silver print. (United States Military Academy Library, West Point, NY; Gift of MG George W. Goethals  (USMA 1880), chief engineer of the Panama Canal)

Ernest “Red” Hallen, “Gatun Middle Locks. Construction of Center Wall, Looking North, from Upper Lock,” February 15, 1911. Gelatin silver print. (USMA Library Special Collections and Archives Department, West Point, NY; Gift of MG George W. Goethals (USMA 1880), chief engineer of the Panama Canal)

Ernest “Red” Hallen, Gatun Upper Locks. View Looking North, Showing Progress of Construction of Upper Guard Gates in the East Chamber, August 5, 1911.  Gelatin silver print. (United States Military Academy Library, West Point, NY; Gift of MG George W. Goethals  (USMA 1880), chief engineer of the Panama Canal)

Ernest “Red” Hallen, “Gatun Upper Locks. View Looking North, Showing Progress of Construction of Upper Guard Gates in the East Chamber,” August 5, 1911. Gelatin silver print. [USMA Library Special Collections and Archives Department,, West Point, NY; Gift of MG George W. Goethals (USMA 1880), chief engineer of the Panama Canal]

The Panama Canal was the largest construction project ever carried out by the United States when it took over the endeavor from the French in 1904. When the canal officially opened on August 15, 1914, it was the pinnacle achievement of the American industrial revolution culminating in the connection of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. The canal was beneficial both economically and strategically to the United States, opening a new route for international commerce, providing a more efficient means for our military to move from one ocean to the other, and positioning America as a dominant power on the world stage.

The sheer size and scope of this project, even by today’s standards, seemed insurmountable. Ultimately, the waterway became a symbol of American pride and identity. The canal and its construction were mainstays of American discourse for well over twenty years. In order to document this marvel, artists, both invited and uninvited, visited the Canal Zone during construction and translated what they saw and experienced into a variety of mediums.

Most artists who visited the Canal Zone were given access to more iconic sites within the construction area to work. However, photographer Ernest Hallen was allowed unprecedented access to all areas of the site and, as a result, gave the American people an incredible perspective of the canal construction from start to finish. In 1907, at the age of 32, Ernest “Red” Hallen was appointed the official photographer of the Panama Canal project by the Isthmian Canal Commission, the American body overseeing the construction of the canal. Hallen remained on site until he retired from federal service in 1937, documenting every aspect of the construction, operation and the surrounding landscape at the Canal Zone. His resulting black and white photographs were published in the newspapers and magazines back home, which, for many Americans, were the only sources to witness the construction of this incredible engineering achievement.

Unlike the convenient and instantly gratifying digital photography used today, photography at the beginning of the 20th century was just beginning to flourish as both a documentary source and an art form. The camera, itself, was a bulky apparatus that had to be transported and set up from site to site. Additionally, the process to create a photograph was manually intensive and time consuming.

Ernest “Red” Hallen, Close View of Slide at Culebra-on-the-dump. Looking South, June 1912.  Gelatin silver print. (United States Military Academy Library, West Point, NY; Gift of MG George W. Goethals  (USMA 1880), chief engineer of the Panama Canal)

Ernest “Red” Hallen, “Close View of Slide at Culebra-on-the-dump. Looking South, June 1912.” Gelatin silver print. [USMA Library Special Collections and Archives Department, West Point, NY; Gift of MG George W. Goethals (USMA 1880), chief engineer of the Panama Canal]

Over his thirty-year career, Hallen produced more than 16,000 photographs of the Canal Zone and the surrounding environment. The images are remarkable because they thoroughly document the canal construction and offer great insight into the redevelopment of the landscape, construction methods, use of the completed canal and the life of the Panamanian population in the Canal Zone over a span of thirty years. Hallen would often return to the same area on multiple occasions to photograph the progress made at a particular site. While the photographs primarily served a documentary purpose, they are raw, highly dramatic images, which, intentionally or not, are beautifully artistic in their composition.

The small selection of Hallen’s oeuvre featured in the exhibition Pictures from Panama at the West Point Museum is from the collection of Major General George Goethals, chief engineer of the Panama Canal and a West Point graduate (Class of 1880). Goethals’ collection of Hallen’s photographs is the most comprehensive and complete set of Hallen’s work, comprising 45 volumes of images, all printed by Hallen, himself. Goethals gave this wonderful collection to the Library at the United States Military Academy. The photographs provide superb visual insight into the construction of the Panama Canal and are great examples of American photography.

*Pictures from Panama opens at the West Point Museum in early December 2014. Please see the Museum Facebook page for exact dates and times: www.facebook.com/westpointmuseum.

Contents contributed by Marlana Cook, Curator of Art, West Point Museum

App of the Week – iTunes U

 

We are continuing a series called App of the Week, wherein we recommend the best apps to support the academic experience. Please let us know what you think, and feel free to provide suggestions for apps we should review.

itunes-uYou may know and love iTunes for music, but did you know that iTunes has an app with access to free educational content from elite universities and cultural institutions worldwide? If you’ve seen it and ignored it, or looked at it long ago and didn’t see anything of interest, now’s the time to check out iTunes U.

iTunes U has been around since 2007 as an underrated resource in iTunes, with its iPad app released in 2012. Far from fading into irrelevance after years of little recognition, iTunes U’s resources and capabilities continue to grow.  According to Apple, iTunes U contains the world’s largest catalog of free education content–over 750,000 free resources (lectures, audio, video, documents) in 7,500 courses on thousands of subjects.

iTunesUCourseShelf

For current students, the iTunes U app can be an excellent supplement or tutor to your ongoing education. Having trouble understanding a particular concept in physics? Download a couple of different courses and look through their problem sets, textbooks, and other resources. Need help with your writing skills? If you can’t make it to the West Point Writing Center in time to answer your question, there’s a course for that.
PhysicsProblems

Thanks to recent upgrades, instructors who upload courses to iTunes U have more teaching tools at their disposal. Previously, instructors could use their internet browser, Apple ID, and a few choice apps to create a course (sending content from their iPad to a computer to a web browser to iTunes) and have it delivered to a student’s iPad. Now, instructors can create course content directly on the iPad, including using the built-in camera to add photos and videos. It’s one-stop course building.

More cool features:
●    Like most Apple products, easy and intuitive to use
●    Variety of course materials supported on iPad include iBooks, PDFs, audio and video lectures, etc.
●    You can take notes and highlight text in iBooks
●    You can download all of the materials over WiFi, then access them on the iPad anywhere, anytime
●    You can opt in to automatic push notifications for a course so you never miss new content

Downsides: I can’t find any on the student side – the instructor side may have some frustrating features.

Bottom line: I think I’ve described enough iTunes U perks – check it out and find a topic you want to study! As always, feel free to let us know what you think, or ask any questions you may have.

Further reading:

EdShelf Review: iTunes U

Apple iTunes U Update Lets Teachers Create Class Content On The iPad

Apple Expands iTunes U Education App for iPads

The views expressed in this post are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Army, Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government. No endorsement or recommendation of any specific products or services is intended or implied.

Contents contributed by Lauren Dodd Hall, Circulation Librarian

The West Point Hotel

The West Point Hotel on  Trophy Point in the mid-1800s.

The West Point Hotel on Trophy Point in the mid-1800s. (image courtesy of USMA Library Special Collections and Archives)

The need for a hotel at West Point was recognized by the USMA Board of Visitors in 1820. Over the next several years, funds for the hotel’s construction were accumulated, largely from the sale of wood cut on the military reservation. Erected on Trophy Point at a cost of $18,000, the hotel was opened in the spring of 1829 for the convenience of officers, relatives and friends of cadets, and the visiting public. It was owned by the Government but leased to private individuals to operate for profit. The lessees paid rent for use of the facilities, the receipts of which were placed in the post contingency fund by the Treasurer, USMA, and used to defray the cost of maintenance and repairs on the hotel building.

The first lessee was William B. Cozzens, who was in charge of the Cadet Mess. The Cozzens family retained the lease for many years. The hotel was usually known by the surname of the current proprietor: Cozzens, Roe, Cranston, Carney, and Logan, among others.

During the 19th century several additions were made to the hotel. In 1890, what is now known as Building 148 was built as the laundry to the West Point Hotel.

It accommodated thousands of visitors to the Academy: Government officials, parents of cadets, noted military figures, and other distinguished guests. The hotel served as a social center for cadets and their families. Until 1887, operation and leasing of the hotel was under the direct supervision of the Superintendent; after that date responsibility was vested in the Quartermaster, USMA. However, the Secretary of War had to approve major decisions regarding the property.

The U.S. Thayer Hotel shortly after opening in 1926.

The U.S. Thayer Hotel which opened in June of 1926. (image courtesy of USMA Library Special Collections and Archives)

By the 20th century the hotel was considered “obsolete and deficient in comfort” and the price of total renovation too prohibitive. An act of March 30, 1920, authorized the Superintendent to lease another part of the West Point reservation for construction and operation of a new hotel. The U.S. Hotel Thayer was subsequently built and opened in June 1926, although the original West Point Hotel continued in operation until it was torn down in 1932.

 

 

Contents contributed by Alicia Mauldin Ware, Archives Curator

 

 

USMA Coat of Arms

Original USMA Coat of Arms

Original USMA Coat of Arms

Current USMA Coat of Arms.

Current USMA Coat of Arms.

USMA Coat of Arms
An official coat of arms for the United States Military Academy was adopted on October 13, 1898. Years later, Captain George Chandler of the War Department brought it to the attention of Superintendent, Major General Fred Winchester Sladen that the eagle and helmet faced to the heraldic sinister, or left, side. In heraldry, the only viewpoint of historical relevance is that of the bearer, to whose right (dexter) the eagle and helmet should face. On July 2, 1923 the Adjutant General of the Army approved a slight revision, which turned the helmet and eagle’s head to the position that we see today.

BLAZONRY
Shield: The shield is that bearing the arms of the United States.
Crest: The crest comprises an eagle with wings, displayed and a scroll bearing the motto, “Duty, Honor, Country,” with the words, “West Point, 1802, USMA.”
Motto: “Duty, Honor, Country”
The emblem consists of the helmet of Pallas Athena, who has been used for many centuries as a symbol of Wisdom and Learning. Pallas Athena was a militant Goddess, fully armed; and since Homer, her wisdom has been associated especially with war and the arts of war. This helmet is over the Greek sword, the universal symbol of war, in its general sense. The two together typify the military and education functions of the Academy. This device, as a coat of arms has been associated with the Academy for many years, and is familiar to its graduates for more than a century. The motto of “Duty, Honor, Country” concisely expresses the character of this institution.
As you walk around the academic area you cannot help but notice the coat of arms carved onto many of the older buildings, as well as the newest academic building, Jefferson Hall, which was completed in 2008.

Contents contributed by Alicia Mauldin Ware, Archives Curator

App of the Week – MyScript Calculator

We are continuing a series called App of the Week, wherein we recommend the best apps to support the academic experience. Please let us know what you think, and feel free to provide suggestions for apps we should review.

myscriptcalculatorChances are, if you’re a USMA cadet, you’re taking at least one class per term that requires some complex calculations. This week’s app, MyScript Calculator, utilizes the iPad’s handwriting translation capabilities and ample screen space to create a powerful, complex calculator – and you can have it with you at all times.

MyScript Calculator won the Mobile App Showdown at CES (Consumer Electronics Show) 2013, and when you try it out, you’ll see how a simple calculator app can actually be pretty cool.

The app background resembles graphing paper, and you simply use your finger (or a stylus) to scribble your equation onto the screen – it then converts to digital text before your eyes. In the top right corner, you’ll see buttons to take you back to a previous calculation, or forward to the current one. A tiny trash can acts as a delete function. That’s pretty much it – though a small button in the top left corner takes you to a menu where you can see a short tutorials and edit your settings, like so:

settingsscreen

And now, you write. Your equation goes from looking like this:

handwrittenequation

to this:

convertedsolvedequation

Here are some of the functions you can perform:

supportedoperators

Helpful features:

●    You can use the “?” symbol to solve for variables, and the calculator will display the correct answer.
●    You have a choice between automatic calculation and manual calculation – if it takes you a little while to write, you may want to switch to manual so your equation doesn’t convert too early. I recommend this option.
●    This lefty loves the left-handed setting!
●    The palm rejection setting allows you to rest your hand on the screen (after you’ve begun writing) without messing up your equation.
●    It will add in elements to make the final equation more clear, like a x (times) or + symbol.

Downsides:

●    MyScript’s handwriting translation capabilities appear to be incredibly accurate, even with my sloppy iPad-handwriting, but it does get it wrong sometimes. However, this is usually pretty obvious, and you can simply go back to your last equation, scribble over the hard-to-read part (just act as if you’re crossing it out), and it disappears.
●    It doesn’t support multi-variable equations.
●    If you start writing too large for the screen, you can’t adjust the screen with pinching motions.
●    Great tool for checking your work, but it doesn’t show how it calculated the equation step-by-step – so it can’t actually teach you how to do it.

Bottom line: MyScript Calculator is a fun, extremely helpful calculator app to have around. Use it to check your next homework assignment, and let us know what you think!

Further Reading:

MyScript Calculator review: Solve math problems by writing on your screen

Education App Fix – MyScript Calculator

The views expressed in this post are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Army, Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government. No endorsement or recommendation of any specific products or services is intended or implied.

Contents contributed by Lauren Dodd Hall, Circulation Librarian

Buildings Repurposed — Riding Hall

Riding HallThe old riding hall was a granite structure with a wooden trussed roof, measuring 218 x 78 feet. There was a call for a new riding hall due to the increase strength of the Corps of Cadets.  With the new increase in the Corps size, the current 1855 Riding Hall was deemed inadequate.

A  Special Board of Officers  which consisted of the Professors of Drawing, Chemistry, Civil and Military Engineering, Mathematics,  the Instructor of Ordnance and Gunnery and the Adjutant of the Military Academy, as Recorder was tasked “to increase the efficiency of the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York, and to provide for the enlargement of buildings and for other necessary works of improvement…”

The 1902 Board of Officers “recommended that a new riding hall, 580 by 125 feet, be constructed on the site of the present hall, cavalry stables and cavalry barracks.  It will be arranged with a counterpoised partition so that it may be divided into two halls when it is desirable to train two squads at the same time.  As the general stable is to be located at the south end of the post, it will be necessary to provide also temporary accommodation for the horses and rooms for all equipments required in the hall.”

The post saw many changes in 1911: the Reveille gun was moved to Trophy Point; the Old Cadet Chapel was moved, stone by stone, to the cemetery to make room for East Academic building; the organ was installed in the New Cadet chapel; and the Riding Hall was completed.

Built within the walls of the old Riding Hall, Thayer Hall was designed by Gehron and Seltzer of New York, and named after Sylvanus Thayer (USMA 1808), Superintendent from 1817-1833.  It was completed in 1958, and originally housed administrative space for the Departments of English, Foreign Languages, Law, Mathematics, Military Art and Engineering, Military Psychology and Leadership, Ordnance and Social Sciences.  It included 98 classrooms, two 200-seat writ rooms, two 200-seat map-problem rooms, an 800-seat auditorium, and a 1,500-seat auditorium, a material testing laboratory, and space on the first and second floors for the Museum which was formerly housed in the Administration Building.  To this day the roof continues to provide parking for nearly 200 vehicles.

Contents contributed by Alicia Mauldin Ware, Archives Curator

Access to NYTimes.com Available through USMA Library

We now have a site license to NYTimes.com available for cadets, faculty, and staff with USMA email addresses. Below is information on how to set up access. You may also view a brief video tutorial on setting up an academic pass.

What is included:

  • Unlimited access to current content posted to NYTimes.com.
  • Unlimited access to archived content published prior to 1923 and after 1980.
  • Five free articles per day published between 1923-1980 (Please note that USMA Library has complete, unlimited archival full-text access to the New York Times separate from the NYTimes.com website).
  • Access to the New York Times via Smartphone app (iPhone, Blackberry 10, Windows Phone 7, Android-powered phones).
  • Access to these services for the life of the contract (until the end of September 2015). Access beyond September 2015 is subject to funding and contract renewal.

What is NOT included:

  • Tablet apps (iPad, Kindle Fire, Windows 8 Desktop and Tablet, Android-powered tablets – You may view all NYTimes.com website content while logged in through the browsers on these devices).
  • E-Reader editions.
  • Premium Crosswords or The New York Times Crosswords apps.
  • Any other premium/subscription-based New York Times apps.
  • Times Premier.
  • The ability to share your Academic Pass digital access with others.

Program eligibility:

  • Anyone with an active usma.edu email address can enroll in the program licensed through USMA Library.
  • Employees, contractors, graduates, and other affiliates without usma.edu email addresses are not eligible.
  • Family members and other dependents are not eligible.

How to enroll:

  • You need to have a valid usma.edu email address and access to that email account.
  • You must log in to or create an NYTimes.com account with your usma.edu email address. Registration FAQ.
  • You cannot claim an Academic Pass if you are already a digital access subscriber.
  • Visit the website: https://myaccount.nytimes.com/verification/edupass to enroll.

How to use the pass:

  • After activating a pass, you need to be logged in to your NYTimes.com account on the device you are using to read New York Times content. While logged in, you can access unlimited content from any network or location for the duration of your pass (late September 2015).

Please let me know if you have any questions or issues.